Back in mid-February I learned about the soaring bald eagle population in Schoharie County and I started counting down the days until I'd be able to see these majestic, powerful and strikingly beautiful birds up close.

The article I wrote back in February was useful spreading the word about this very unique opportunity we're lucky to have in the Capital Region as well as to encourage you to submit name suggestions for two of the bald eagles that have become partners for life.  Many of your name suggestions have made the final list and we need you to make one final vote.

The images captured by local bald eagle historian Bill Combs Jr. are some of finest you'll ever see and showcase the power, beauty, and wonderment of this apex predator that few have been luck enough to see up close.  But that's about to change.

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We are now less than a week away from the grand opening of the Schoharie County Eagle Trail on April 24, and the two lovebirds that have become the face of the trail will get their official names on Saturday during the virtual launch of the Schoharie County Eagle Trail.

We've narrowed it down to the final 10 name suggestions and we hope you take a second to vote and also learn more about this historic grand opening of the eagle trail that Schoharie County - and the rest of us - are super excited about.

Here are the 10 final name combinations that have been suggested:

  • George & Martha
  • John Jacob (Kobel) & Anna Maria (who settled/established Cobleskill) 
  • Jack & Diane
  • Stars & Stripes
  • Liberty & Justice
  • Ricky & Lucy
  • Johnny (Cash) & June
  • Ozzie & Harriet (from the old 1950s television sitcom)
  • Joe & Jill (Biden)
  • Romeo & Juliet
Photo: William H Combs Jr. Schoharie County Eagle Trail Facebook

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