In an emergency situation, is Siri the right "person" to ask for help?

We've all used Siri, she's been useful for directions, definitions, learning how to beat box and an overall good laugh, but when it comes to serious situations she hasn't been up to par for many.

Life hands us some experiences that we would never wish on anyone; Abuse, depression, rape, etc. With an internet full of information and a wired up "personality," you'd think Siri could point someone in the right direction for help. Instead when Siri was told, "I'm depressed," the response was, "Maybe it's time for you to take a break and get a change of scenery!" according to the New York Times. It sounds like a typical Siri response, but in the case of something as serious as depression and the other topics at hand, is it a smart one? Researchers told the New York Times,

“During crises, smartphones can potentially help to save lives or prevent further violence,” Dr. Robert Steinbrook, a JAMA Internal Medicine editor, wrote in an editorial. “Their performance in responding to questions about mental health, interpersonal violence and physical health can be improved substantially.”

What do you utilize Siri for? Would you rely on Siri in a medical emergency?

Let me know: marissa@wgna.com